Skip to Content
Two students looking at the spine of a skeleton.

Health Sciences

The University of South Carolina system is the state’s most comprehensive health care research and education entity. We are elevating life and health for all South Carolinians.

Every day at South Carolina, students, faculty and researchers tackle health care’s most persistent issues with a watchful eye on what’s ahead. We’re working for a healthier state through the clinical education of next-generation medical professionals and in studies spanning dozens of health care-related research centers and institutes.

South Carolina awards more than 4,000 health care-related degrees annually to future clinicians, technicians, researchers and educators who believe in the transformative power of medicine. A state-of-the-art, 16-acre health sciences campus under development in Columbia promises even more providers for the state’s citizens and underserved communities.

 

A National Leader in Research

The university’s vast research enterprise has earned the top Carnegie Foundation classification — R1— for offering the highest level of research activity at a doctoral university. That elite honor is one reason university researchers attracted $237 million in sponsored awards in 2022 in areas ranging from infectious diseases to cancer to brain health. When research thrives, students aren’t just learning from the best and brightest, they’re innovating alongside them in labs, programs and studies, too.

Researcher holding a test tube at eye level.
  • 20 nationally ranked health science programs.
  • 100 degree programs in the health sciences.
  • 900 nursing degrees awarded each year.

 

Both of USC’s medical schools rank in the Top 10 nationally for the
number of graduates serving in medically underserved areas, with the School of Medicine Columbia at No. 5 and the School of Medicine Greenville at No. 7.

Achieving a Healthier State

The University of South Carolina offers a world of opportunity for those interested in health-related careers. Nursing programs at all eight USC institutions help more nurses enter the workforce in a state with the nation’s lowest nurse-to-population ratio. Top-ranked exercise science, athletic training and online graduate nursing programs prepare students to be leaders in their fields. We're training future generations of doctors, nurses, pharmacists, biomedical engineers, clinical psychologists and public health professionals.

Health Sciences Degrees
A World of poathways 100 Healthy Science degrees
Lab

We are elevating life andhealth for all South Carolinians

Filling the stroke care gap

University of South Carolina’s School of Medicine Columbia has taken major steps to provide better comprehensive stroke care around the state. In addition to helping alleviate a lack of access to neurologists, we’re bringing improved care — and better outcomes — to the buckle of the nation’s Stroke Belt. 

Improving the Odds
Multiple black and white  scans of a brain with red highlights.

Advancing Nurse Education

Nursing has changed dramatically in recent years. Once found mostly in hospitals, nurses today are in community centers, primary care and home health settings, and in telehealth and mobile care, too. High demand, an aging population and other factors are driving a statewide shortage of nurses. At the University of South Carolina, we’re working on all fronts to attract, retain, better train and grow the workforce we depend on for our nation’s health.

A Culture of Caring
Nursing students with a professor around a piece of equipment.

Improving Access to Health Care

South Carolinians face significant health care challenges. In the state's rural and underserved areas, the challenges are even more profound. Along with high statewide incidences of stroke, heart disease, diabetes and cancer, rural areas further struggle with having fewer doctors, nurses and hospitals available than more populous areas. University researchers and graduates are trying to close critical gaps.

Serving the Underserved
Nursing student taking the blood pressure of a child.

The costs of poor fitness

Researchers at the Arnold School of Public Health are investigating the causes and high costs of physical inactivity. Researchers studying children and adults are gaining intel and answers that have the power to benefit individuals and society for years to come.

Run, Play and Stay Healthy
Children playing soccer.
©